5 Jul 2014

Why are we bagging Australia? Do we enjoy living here?


Don't believe the politicians, Australia is not on the brink of disaster.
Perhaps some minor tinkling is needed but nothing brutal.

Our nation feels a little sullied and shackled by our politicians description of our great country.

 Australians might undervalue and perhaps even take for granted what we have, but lets think about it for a moment.

About every measure of the fundamental elements of the so called good life, where individuals have the opportunity to explore their potential is here in Australia.

Australia is, without gilding the Lilly, the envy of the world. Life expectancy is higher than in most nations and infant mortality is lower.

We don't die of epidemics that sweep our country.

Our lives are not threatened by civil wars or similar and most people who want a job have a job.

 Abject poverty is rare. We've clean water, good food security and our children have access to education.

We have universal health care and a social security safety net.


There are are many more positives about Australia, its sufficient to say that we're still a lucky country and why, because of the people that live here.
We Australians work longer hours than most other countries and no matter what politicians say we are not users and have never believed we were entitled to something we did not contribute to.

The world’s leading public policy research agency, the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), has just released its Better Life Index, which compares the richest nations’ social and economic outcomes.

Australia topped the 34 nations overall, easily outstripping the US and a number of European countries, and had the highest ranking on health, safety, environmental care and civic engagement.


Yet the political rhetoric here would have us believe the place is on the brink of catastrophe.

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